15 Comments
Jun 10, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

What a feast this was to read. Thank you Rosalynne and Betsy!

Expand full comment
Jun 10, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

Call me a sap but I love both equally. Some times I wish to stay with my roots especially when I find yet another part of the trunk I havent examined except some times its mulch adod about nothing so I just leaf it alone. But other times I like to branch out and pine fur the new and that is oakay too because it so elmentary and I feel all spruced up, you bircha

My double liking might not be poplar in some places but it's not mean or making an ash of myself, I just go aspen in the past because sometimes Im content with life and sometimes I sycamore because Im board and thats the plane truth but I dont want to palm off my views on anybody because that maple the wool over their eyes and make them feel bushed and that wood knot be good for anyone and ssome people might try to form a splinter group dust to be stubborn.

Expand full comment
author

Hahahaha! This is amazing. How mad would you be if I borrowed the phrase “mulch ado about nothing” for my upcoming memoir about my backyard garden? I love plants but I didn’t get the green thumb that runs in my family lol

Expand full comment
Jun 10, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

I would lake dot berry mulch. Flail free. Dew id.

Jest gift me cred. like " Eye yam sappling from Ernie Brills 6/9 "Tree Tis".

Tanks very mooch.

Expand full comment

Reading your old blog post was a revelation to me, as I didn't meet you until a few years later.

Re my own family tree, my dad died when I was seven and Mom cut ties with his entire side of the family, so by the time I was interested in genealogical research, there were few people around to ask questions of. Mom had two living half sisters and two step-sisters, but she claimed to be an only child. All this to say my family of birth was pretty small. Now it's just me and my sister and our families.

One big puzzle in my family is Mom's dad claimed his grandmother was Native American. I tried tracing her (I know her name and birthplace), even made a trip to Tallequah, Oklahoma to search the rolls. Her brother was enrolled in the Cherokee tribe, but she was not. Later I did a DNA test which showed zero Native American blood. So was she or not? If so, why do I have no Native American blood? I have thoughts, but no proof, and no one left alive to interrogate.

I briefly had two stepsisters from my first step-father, but he lived only two years after he and Mom married, and I never saw the stepsisters again. (They didn't live with us, but visited occasionally.)

Both sides of my birth family apparently migrated here in the 1700s from Ireland and England. The Irish side were actually Scots who migrated to Northern Ireland from Scotland. I wouldn't mind doing my family tree again. Starting from scratch, because I'm positive my tree on Ancestry.com was filled with inaccuracies. The cost in money and time hold me back.

Expand full comment
author

Sandra, your family tree sounds perfect for an episode of Dani Shapiro’s podcast, Family Secrets. Have you listened to it? I discovered it earlier this year and have binged my way through several seasons. It’s so good!

Expand full comment

I haven't! I'll have to check it out, thanks.

Expand full comment
Jun 12, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

Interesting topic and perspective! Made me really think about connections of my family and especially of my friends! Some are almost unbelievable! 😳

Expand full comment
Jun 11, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

Ooh lovely, I am downloading both of these books now, thank you 😊

Expand full comment
Jun 10, 2023Liked by Rosalynn Tyo, Elizabeth Marro

Remarkably bright creatures is on my TBR

Expand full comment
author

I hope you like it! It was a hit with my book club.

Expand full comment

Hi Rosalynn, Thanks for the book recs and this week’s post. What a gorgeous moment of zen. I wanted to recommend this children’s book for anyone who teaches or parents kids who might think their family looks different than their friends- they all look so similar different no?- It’s called A Family is a Family is a Family. I loved reading this book with our foster son. https://www.auntiesbooks.com/book/9781554987948

I’m also writing a memoir with some references to my backyard garden- mine is actually about our experience as a foster family

Expand full comment
author

Thanks, Mary! I must confess, I was just kidding about the memoir - my failings as a gardener could be summed up in an essay, at most! But your memoir sounds absolutely lovely and I look forward to reading it. I wish I had A Family is a Family is a Family years ago, when my kids were still small and newly bereaved. Looks like an ideal read for primary school teachers, especially the ones who are still committed to the corny Father’s Day/ Mother’s Day activities ;)

Expand full comment

I know that feeling of finding resources after the point where we most need them. And it’s never too late to take up gardening- it’s kind of like writing- it gets better just by doing it. My first foray into gardening involved a head to toe poison ivy case that resulted in me needing steroids - thankfully my health and my skills have improved with time. 😊

Expand full comment
author

Whoa! So far I’ve only injured the plants, not myself! I’m glad to hear you recovered :)

Expand full comment